Understanding Scheduler Resilience
in JD Edwards

Oracle recently introduced a new feature on their JD Edwards platform called Scheduler Resilience. In this article, we’ll explore the functionality of Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards, and how it interacts with the platform’s most popular features.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

The Scheduler Resilience feature in JD Edwards is primarily used to run notifications and orchestrations at designated intervals, which can run as a process on one or multiple AIS Servers. The Scheduler Resilience feature is able to tolerate failures, restart with little to no human intervention, and load balance if it or another scheduler is falling behind.

You may be wondering why we can’t use the standard JD Edwards scheduler to execute these sorts of jobs. The primary reason is because the standard scheduler in JDE doesn’t have a tolerance built into it. Meaning if the JDE scheduler fails, it needs human intervention to get up and running again. It also doesn’t contain any load balancing capabilities. With the Scheduler Resilience feature on the AIS Server, we can store the scheduled job properties for the notifications and orchestrations in a database. This means if a server fails, the scheduler running on the other AIS Server can continue to operate.

To explore Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards, we’ll dive into this new feature through the following step-by-step example:

  • We’ll create a new orchestration to submit data pattern R0008P UBE every five minutes. We’ll walk through starting the scheduler, and verifying if the job is running successfully. After verifying the regular scheduler is running successfully, we’ll enable the Scheduler Resilience feature through the server manager console to ensure the job is running smoothly. We’ll be using JDE Lab 9.2 for this example.

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Walking Through the Scenario

Step 1: Create an orchestration to submit a job every 5 minutes. We’ll need a service request and a schedule to create this orchestration.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Step 2: Create a schedule.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Step 3: Create an orchestration.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Step 4: Start the scheduler and verify the job is running successfully on the primary AIS Server (don’t forget to set necessary UDO security while doing this). In the following screenshots, you can see we’ve started the scheduler successfully.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards
Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Step 5: Enable Scheduler Resilience on the AIS Server. From this point forward, the AIS scheduler will begin saving job information in the database. Keep in mind during this process, you may have to restart the AIS Server.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Step 6: Start the scheduler and verify that the job is getting submitted.

Scheduler Resilience in JD Edwards

Concluding the Scenario

So far in this Scheduler Resilience example, we were able to accomplish the following goals:

  • Create an orchestration to submit a report

  • Run the report successfully on the AIS Server

  • Configure the Scheduler Resilience feature to store critical information in the database

In future blog posts, we’ll explore running the scheduler on multiple AIS Servers while simulating a full fail-over situation.

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